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Austin 5K/3K Run/Walk

CANA and TUC are in the planning stages for a 5K/3K Run/Walk in Austin. We hope this will be the first race of an annual event for all the citizens of Austin.

Why a 5K Run and 3K Walk in Austin?

  • Why Not!
  • We need more Institutions for our families both young and old
  • Provides healthy activity for all members of our families
  • We need more options for entertainment and activities
  • We can showcase our neighborhood and the new Austin we can become
  • Provides a new outlet for our youth and adults together
  • We can organize successful events that benefit local businesses and residents
  • Our community can welcome visitors to our revitalization efforts

 Date: Late September/October 2011

Course: Start in Columbus Park -> run through city streets

(Central, Race, Parkside, Ohio, West End, Mayfield, Adams, Menard, Mason) -> End in Columbus Park

Proposed Route: 

  1.  Columbus Park Refectory (starting line), turning right on to W. Jackson heading east;
  2.  W. Jackson to S. Central, and turning left (north);
  3.  S. Central to W. Race, turning left (west);
  4.  W. Race to N. Parkside, turning right (north);
  5.  N. Parkside to W. Ohio, turning left (west);
  6.  W. Ohio to N. Mayfield, turning left (south);
  7. N. Mayfield to West End. turning right (west):
  8. West End to N. Mason, turning left (south);
  9. N. Mason to slight left, and crossing Madison to continue on to N. Mason
  10. N. Mason to W. Adams, turning left and continuing to S. Menard where we–
  11. Turn right (south) finish line back at the Refectory (or close to it).

 – Volunteers and Sponsors are Welcome

– Schools encouraged to field groups including teachers and parents

– Churches are encouraged to field groups for Walk or Run

– Businesses are encouraged to be sponsors

– Institutions are encouraged to support through donations in goods/services/money

We plan for a CARA Certified Race 

We would like to include a Health Fair at the Start and Finish Line in Columbus Park

We would like live entertainment from local groups.

We would like a live band.

We want residents, businesses and institutions to support refreshment tables and music along the race course.

We will need posters and bill boards once sponsors are determined.

2010_CARA BEST PRACTICES GUIDELINES_web

Austin Community Collaborations

Building Institutions, Bridging Organizations

 

www.MyAustinChicago.com

Victoria Prewitt

Serethea Reid

Junnell Dennison

Ron Reid

Alderman Deborah Graham

Pastor Brian Covell

Dwayne Truss

Jeanette Stovall

Minister Yancy Carothers

Anita Hayes

Brian Covell

     Event Plan – Working Document

The Austin 5K Run 3K Walk & Health and Wellness Fair

 

 

 

  1. 1.       Background                                     page  1
  2. 2.       Goals and Requirements                  page  2
  3. 3.       Pre-Event Planning                           page  5
  4. 4.       Marketing Plan                                page  15
  5. 5.       Fundraising                                     page  19
  6. 6.       Race Day Operations                       page  20
  7. 7.       Budget                                            page  21
  8. 8.       Follow-up and Evaluation                  page 23

 

  

 

 

Why a 5K Run and 3K Walk in Austin? 

  • Why Not!
  • We need more Institutions for our families both young and old
  • Provides healthy activity for all members of our families
  • We need more options for entertainment and activities
  • We can showcase our neighborhood and the new Austin we can become
  • Provides a new outlet for our youth and adults together
  • We can organize successful events that benefit local businesses and residents
  • Our community can welcome visitors to our revitalization efforts

 Date: September 25 2011

 

 

 

 

Austin 5K/3K Run/Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Course: Start in Columbus Park -> run through city streets

(Central, Race, Parkside, Ohio, West End, Mayfield, Adams, Menard, Mason) -> End in Columbus Park

Proposed Route: 

  1.  Columbus Park Refectory (starting line), turning right on to W. Jackson heading east;
  2.  W. Jackson to S. Central, and turning left (north);
  3.  S. Central to W. Race, turning left (west);
  4.  W. Race to N. Parkside, turning right (north);
  5.  N. Parkside to W. Ohio, turning left (west);
  6.  W. Ohio to N. Mayfield, turning left (south);
  7. N. Mayfield to West End. turning right (west):
  8. West End to N. Mason, turning left (south);
  9. N. Mason to slight left, and crossing Madison to continue on to N. Mason
  10. N. Mason to W. Adams, turning left and continuing to S. Menard where we–
  11. Turn right (south) finish line back at the Refectory (or close to it).

 
 

 – Volunteers and Sponsors are Welcome

– Schools encouraged to field groups including teachers and parents

– Churches are encouraged to field groups for Walk or Run

– Businesses are encouraged to be sponsors

– Institutions are encouraged to support through donations in goods/services/money

We plan for a CARA Certified Race 

We would like to include a Health Fair at the Start and Finish Line in Columbus Park

We would like live entertainment from local groups.

We would like a live band.

We want residents, businesses and institutions to support refreshment tables and music along the race course.

We will need posters and bill boards once sponsors are determined.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pre-Event Planning

  1. Determine Date & Location
    i.      Get the necessary permits from the city. 
  2. Map out exact race route.
  3. Create volunteer committee
    i.      Set committee meetings
    ii.     Determine volunteers needed
  4. Determine Registration Logistics
    i.      How will people pre-register?
    ii.     What information do we need to gather?
    iii.    Signed Liability Waiver Approval

Determine Race day set-up.
i.      Determine timeline for Set-up
ii.     Where will people park?
iii.    Where should we place the registration table?
        1.      Determine sign-in process and numbering.
        2.      Hand out timing buttons.
iv.    Where should we place the medical tent?
v.     Where should we have water stops?
vi.    Where should we have the award ceremony?           
        1.      Obtain race medals
        2.      Determine ceremony host.
        3.      Determine A/V needs.
        4.      Write ceremony script. 
vii.   Determine where we need signage.
        1.      Design Signage
        2.      Print Signage
viii.  Set-up place and time for sponsors to drop of bag filling cache keys.
        1.      Gather volunteers and have bag filling get together.
ix.    Find a volunteer photographer or videographer.

 

Determine Race day set-up.
i.      Determine timeline for Set-up
ii.     Where will people park?
iii.    Where should we place the registration table?
        1.      Determine sign-in process and numbering.
        2.      Hand out timing buttons.
iv.    Where should we place the medical tent?
v.     Where should we have water stops?
vi.    Where should we have the award ceremony?           
        1.      Obtain race medals
        2.      Determine ceremony host.
        3.      Determine A/V needs.
        4.      Write ceremony script. 
vii.   Determine where we need signage.
        1.      Design Signage
        2.      Print Signage
viii.  Set-up place and time for sponsors to drop of bag filling cache keys.
        1.      Gather volunteers and have bag filling get together.
ix.    Find a volunteer photographer or videographer.
 


 

CARA BEST PRACTICES GUIDELINES

Adopted: December 1990

Revised: October 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009

The following Best Practices Guidelines have been prepared by the Chicago Area Runners Association (CARA) for Race Directors and race committees to ensure quality, safe and successful races. CARA races must adhere to these Guidelines.

I. RACE APPLICATIONS, WEBSITES & ONLINE REGISTRATION

CARA is encouraging races to “GO GREEN,” to eliminate paper applications and utilize online registration. Provide an online printable application for runners who wish to use that option.

The elimination of paper applications does not eliminate the obligation to provide runners with complete information about your race.

The website/online registration site should provide the following information:

Appropriate CARA logo

Date of race

Start time(s)

Distance(s)

Exact location of start (street address)

USATF course certification status

Access to driving directions

Course description

Parking information

Contact person/phone/email

Full range of shirt sizes: small, medium, large and x-large

Specific advance registration instructions and fees

Race day registration instructions and fees

Age groups for awards

Online sites for race results

CARA promotional statement

Clear statement that bicycles, in-line skates, other wheeled vehicles (except wheelchairs) and dogs are not allowed

 

 

Clear statement of race’s position on use of baby joggers and strollers in race (see below: V. SAFETY)

Registration forms include:

Full name, address, city, state, zip, phone, age, date of birth, sex and email address

Separate check-off for runners and walkers

CARA discount***

Space for CARA membership number

Liability waiver for runners 18 and over; signature of parent or guardian for runners under 18

 

CARA members should be able to take the CARA discount up to and including the latest online and mail-in cutoff dates. Discounts need not be given for race day registrations.

***The following are CARA’s recommended discounts for CARA members

Entry fee of $24 or less…………..$3.00

25 – 29……………… 4.00

30 – 39……………… 5.00

40 and over…………6.00

II. COURSE

____The course must be USATF certified (not the same as sanctioning).

____There is a lead vehicle, with a driver or passenger familiar with the

course which will follow the course exactly and remain within general

view of front runners.

____A race official will follow the last runner/walker with ability

to communicate with race staff.

____Course is clearly marked by direction signs and/or surface paint.

____Each mile point of the race is clearly marked, including mile 3 in a

5k and mile 6 in a 10k.

____A digital clock, or a person calling out split times clearly and

accurately is located at miles 1 and 2 of a 5k race and at least every

two miles in races longer than 5k to allow a runner to maintain an

accurate pace throughout the race.

____The course is closed to all traffic or there is a clearly marked lane

for runners. If possible, parking is prohibited on streets designated

 

 

 

for the race course.

____Marshals are present at every intersection and change in course

direction.

____The number of marshals is adequate to ensure that runners can

follow the course safely and accurately. Police should not be used

as course marshals.

____Police or adult volunteers are located at busy intersections to direct

traffic.

III. AID STATIONS

______ Aid stations are located at the race start and finish and at least every 2 ½ miles on the race course, but not at a mile split.

______ The frequency and stocking of aid stations must be increased beyond standards for warm weather races, for anticipated extreme heat conditions (75+) and for races with large numbers of less experienced runners. We recommend that races research historical weather data for the proposed date of the race to anticipate fluid needs. We suggest that races with more than 3,000 participants are more likely to have a large number of less experienced runners.

______ A communication system (cell phones or radios) must be in place for communication between selected aid station personnel and race director.

______ Aid stations must be equipped with an on-course system to communicate with runners in the event of an emergency, race stoppage, or adverse weather conditions. Suggested system: 4 signs/flags: green (proceed), yellow (slow down, proceed with caution), red (slow down, consider stopping, follow official instructions), black (stop, event cancelled, follow official instructions).

______ Enough pre-poured fluids and cups are provided so that the last runner at each station and at the finish line has fluids available.

 

 

 

IV. MEDICAL

______ Race must have liability insurance.

______ Prior to race, ambulance service must be arranged for and available to the race in case of an emergency. An on-site ambulance is strongly suggested.

______ A system must exist for communication between the race personnel on the course (aid stations, course marshals) and race staff, with the capability to summon emergency medical assistance to any place on the race course.

______ For minor medical needs, e.g. ice, adhesive bandages, etc., provide a visible location at the finish line with supplies and a qualified provider.

V. SAFETY

______ A safety plan must be in place for use of the communication system at all stages of race (when to call, whom to call).

______ All course volunteers must be instructed in course of action in event of an emergency.

______ See above Aid Stations and Medical sections for further information relating to communication systems.

______ Due to safety concerns for infants/children and runners, CARA

strongly recommends that baby joggers and strollers not be allowed in races.

If, despite this recommendation, a race permits the entry of baby joggers and strollers, it must:

Publicize this fact (some runners will avoid races with baby joggers and strollers)

Warn participants of the inherent danger of mixing infants/children in vehicles with competitive runners

Insist and enforce that runners with baby joggers and strollers start behind runners

Must have race insurance which allows and covers baby joggers and strollers in a race. RRCA (Road Runners Club of America), which provides general liability insurance, offers this statement with regard to

 

 

risk management guidelines. (We include it as a point of information.)

 

“…while activities such as animal events, skateboard events, baby jogger events, roller skate or blade events,…..will not void a club’s insurance coverage, these types of events are strongly discouraged because of the high risk for potential injury which could cause an increase in RRCA insurance premiums, or, even worse, a refusal by the insurance company to renew the RRCA’s liability policy.”

______ IF LIGHTNING/THUNDER IS PRESENT, OR OTHER CONDITIONS DEEMED DANGEROUS BY RACE PERSONNEL, THE RACE MAY NOT PROCEED. A race may proceed once the danger of lightning and/or dangerous condition has clearly passed.

VI. TOILET FACILITIES

______ At least one functioning toilet (including indoor toilet facilities) for every 40 runners is located at the race site for races 10 miles or longer or over 1,000 runners. At least one functioning toilet for every 50 runners for all other races.

VII. GEAR CHECK

______ A secure area is clearly designated for runners’ gear, when appropriate. Consider distance to parking and number of runners not traveling by car.

VIII. RACE DAY REGISTRATION AND PACKET PICKUP

______ All runners receive race instructions, medical and aid station information. Course maps should be available: on line, in packets or posted at race.

______ Separate tables or lines are provided for pre-registered runners and for race day entrants.

______ Sufficient volunteers are recruited to handle pre-registered

runners, race day registrants and packet pick-up in a timely

manner on race day.

 

 

 

______ If team competition is available, separate tables or lines are provided for team registration.

______ If Clydesdale (weight) competition is available, separate tables/lines and weigh-in station are provided for Clydesdales.

______ Race day registration closes at least fifteen minutes prior to the start of the race.

IX. START

______ The starting line is clearly marked on the ground by tape, paint, or chalk.

______ A false start line is designated, behind the real start line

(except in electronically timed races).

______ Sound system is utilized which ensures that all runners can hear pre-race instructions and the starting gun or horn.

______ Since runners have already done their warm ups, speeches by dignitaries, physicians, entertainers, sponsors, etc. and any other ceremonies should be conducted before runners gather at the start line.

______ To avoid false starts, the method of starting is explained. A countdown is not used within 30 seconds of the start.

______ Reminder announcement to be made regarding use of flag/sign runner warning system.

______ Where race does prohibit them, a reminder announcement is made prior to start about prohibition of baby joggers and strollers, bicycles, in-line skates, roller skates, scooters, other wheeled vehicles (except wheelchairs), or dogs.

______ Walkers and runners do not start simultaneously. Walkers are

instructed to line up behind runners and have a separate, later start.

______ A system is in place which ensures faster runners are positioned in front of all other runners at the start; and all other runners are positioned in accordance with their expected finishing time, with the slowest runners at the back.

 

 

 

______ The start and finish areas are kept clear of non-participants.

______ Race is started exactly at the advertised time, even if people are still waiting to register or pick up packets.

______ The first 200 meters of the race maintain a constant width so that runners are not funneled together.

X FINISH

______ The finish line is clearly marked on the ground by tape, paint, or chalk.

______ A digital clock is provided at the finish line to display runners’ finish times.

______ Adequate means are provided to ensure accurate timing of each finisher.

______ The number of finish chutes is adequate so no one is ever backed up in front of the finish line.

______ Runners and walkers should have separate chutes if the events are separate.

______ Race results/chip retrieval locations must be situated at a distance from end of chutes to avoid backup in the chutes.

______ Manual backup of automated and computerized results, as well as a backup chronomix, is required for verification of the timing system (except in electronically timed races).

XI. RESULTS/AWARDS

______ Clock time or electronically attained times may be used for determining overall and age group winners, according to which form the race uses in publishing its official results. However, state and national records must be clock-timed, according to USATF rules.

______ The top male and female finishers overall should be recognized and awarded.

 

 

 

______ Awards are to be given to the first three finishers in each age group. For the purpose of determining age group awards, overall winners are removed from the results and do not receive age group awards. Overall winners are included in age group results for final reporting purposes.

______ If awards are not distributed or available on race day, they must be mailed to all winners in a timely fashion, at no cost to the runners.

______ CARA Runners’ Choice Circuit Races must use five year age groups for awards.

______ CARA recommended age groups for Certified Races are as follows: Male and female – 14 & under, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80 and over. (These age groups may be combined but not divided.

(Runners have a decided preference for 5 year age groups.)

XII. POST RACE

______ Submit (or instruct results person/company to submit) one copy of age group and overall results directly to CARA (brian@cararuns.org) within 24 hours of the race. Use Word Pad or html, if possible. Include name, age, sex, hometown, finishing time, overall place, and age group place for all participants. Include overall winners in age group results.

XIII. MISCELLANEOUS

_____ Race will have an email system whereby it can communicate with registered runners both prior to and after a race in the

event of race cancellation, scoring issues, CARA post-race survey, etc.

_____ Race must participate in CARA post-race online survey.

Chicago Area Runners Association

549 W Randolph St

Chicago IL 60661

Phone 312.666.9836

Fax 312.781.1736

www.cararuns.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Marketing

  1. Confirm Naming
  2. Create & Approve Logo
  3. Create the “why” story
    i.      What challenges are faced that drive fundraising?
    ii.     Contact people who have or will benefit from fundraising and tell their story.
  4. Create Brochure & Registration Form for Runners/Walkers
    i.      Distribute brochures to running stores or places of interest
  5. Create Brochure & Registration Form for Sponsors
    i.      Determine Sponsorship Levels & Incentives
  6. Create Posters/Flyers for Distribution
  7. Create Website
    i.      Allow people to register online
  8. Additional Marketing Online
    i.      Create YouTube Video Channel
            1.      Make video promoting event
            2.      Shoot video at event to promote next year
            3.      Gather stories of people who have benefited.
    ii.     Create a Flickr Account
            1.      Post pictures online.
            2.      Create social networking profiles
            3.      Create Events
            4.      Make Friends

i.    Design & print volunteer & racer t-shirts. Add to racer bags.

 

Race Sponsorship Benefits

Lace up your sneakers and team up with the 1st Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair. Get involved with the community and build your business with sports marketing and sponsorship opportunities. Enclosed please find Sponsorship and Exhibitor information. We can also package a plan to fit your company’s marketing goals and objectives. By sponsoring an event, a company receives marketing benefits in exchange for a fee. Event Sponsorship is unique because it delivers a powerful brand message through memorable consumer experiences and awareness.

Mass Media

E-mail marketing, local newspaper, TV and radio station mentions, collateral materials including registration forms, posters, banners and up to ??? impressions of print advertising.

Website

Promotional giveaways, online registration, feature and listings/links on the website plus, registration made easy on active.com, the “go to” website for runners, walkers.

Exclusivity “Official Product”

Example: Loretto Hospital is an Official  Sponsor of the Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair.

Product Placement

Showcasing, demonstration and sampling onsite or in goodie bag.

Logo Identification

Logo on T-shirts, banners and signs and onsite p.a. announcements.

Example: Mile Markers sponsored by Alderman Deborah Graham’s Office.

Stage Presentations and Speaking Opportunities

Get noticed by the masses by sponsoring the entertainment, special area or award ceremony.

 

Marketing Benefits

Measurable Return on Your Investment Relationship Marketing

Sponsorship is another way to maximize your networking circle by partnering with industry leaders. Monies raised during the Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair will benefit next years Event and other Austin Community Institutions in development.

Community Relations

Benefit from the goodwill created by supporting the Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair, which encourages a wholesome, healthy lifestyle while supporting the Austin Community.

Qualitative Pay-Out

Leadership positioning, positive association, and community goodwill.

Employee Impact

Fosters internal employee wellness, camaraderie and teamwork.

Sponsorship Levels

Gold Sponsor $2,000

  • ·  Exclusive sponsor in your specialty or market segment
  • ·  Company name and/or logo displayed on race t-shirt
  • ·  Company name/logo listed on collateral materials
  • ·  Company name/logo included in press release
  • ·  Company listed on  Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair website with link to company’s website
  • ·  Distribution of promotional materials in race bags
  • ·  Banner or sign on the race course at one of the mile markers
  • ·  Company recognized during awards ceremony
  • ·  5 free race entries
  • ·  Table, banner or other presence at the finish line
  • ·  Company name and/or logo displayed on race t-shirt
  • ·  Company name/logo listed on collateral materials
  • ·  Company listed on Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair
  • ·  Distribution of promotional materials in race bags
  • ·  Company recognized during awards ceremony
  • ·  Distribution of products or services on-site during race and festival
  • ·  Promotional materials in participant bags
  • ·  Company listed on  Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair website
  • ·  Distribution of products or services on-site during race and festival
  • ·  Promotional materials in participant bags

Silver Sponsor $1000

Bronze Sponsor $150

Other Sponsorship Opportunities

Stage Sponsor (1) – $500

Be the sponsor of our stage and awards ceremony.

Water Station Sponsor – $300

Have your logo displayed at all of the water stations located throughout the route

 

Goodie Bag – $75

Expand your reach and put your product sample directly into the hands of over ??? runners and walkers through our professionally managed Goodie Bag Program. Goodie Bag items are a cost effective way to target sports enthusiasts as well as health and family-oriented consumers.

Proceeds from the Annual Austin 5K Family Fun Run, Walk  & Health Fair will benefit  Austin Community Collaborations for next years Event and other planned Austin Community Institutions. 

National Runner Demographics**

Male Long Distance Runners

  • ·  Average Age: 45 years old
  • ·  54% are married
  • ·  76% males had 2006 household income of $75,000 or more
  • ·  80% have college degree; 37% have post-graduate degree
  • ·  Favorite race distances: Half-Marathon, Marathon, 10K
  • ·  Average Age: 39 years old
  • ·  62% are married
  • ·  64% males had 2006 household income of $75,000 or more
  • ·  79% have college degree; 42% have post-graduate degree
  • ·  Favorite race distances: Half-Marathon, 5k, 10K

Female Long Distance Runners

– USARunning.org

 

  • ·  There are over 37 million runners in the U.S.
  • ·  11 million run at least 100 times per year
  • ·  Runners spend $125 billion on health-related goods and services
  • ·  16 million runners have a household income of $75,000 or more
  • ·  Nearly 55% hold a college degree versus the national average of 33%
  • ·  In 2007, runners spent $8.5 billion on their sport with $2 billion going to the purchase of Footwear
  • ·  30% of runners buy 4 or more pairs of shoes per year
  • ·  8.1 million road race finishers in 2006
  • ·  43% of runners have been at the sport for over 10 years
  • ·  21% have been running for over 20 years
  • ·  Average age of male runners: 27-31 years old
  • ·  Average age of female runners: 23-26 years old

**2008

Sample Sponsor Logos

            

2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fundraising

  1. Gather list of potential donors
    i.      Send Brochure
    ii.      Hand brochures to every foreseeable participant or sponsor  
    iii.     Make follow-up phone calls
  2. Determine how money will be collected.
     

 

 


 

Race Day Operations

  1. Set-up 
    i.      Registration
            1.      Hand out numbers & timing censors & goodie bags
            2.      Coat check, bag check?
    ii.     Signage
    iii.    Watering Stations
            1.      Water must be pre-purchased
            2.      Volunteers in place
    iv.      A/V, Award Ceremony
             1.      Electricity must be available, figure how much you need.
    v.      Handout radios for on-site communication 
    vi.     Medical tent
             1.      Find volunteer medical staff
             2.      Gather ice & supplies
  2. Run the Race
  3. Post results for serious runners.

Tear down the event

 

 

 

 

 


   
 

City Permits Package -fees

500.00
Insurance 1000.00
CARA Application  -fees 350.00
USATF Certification -course 650.00
Race Timer/Digital Clocks Rental 400.00
Water and Aid Station Table rental 500.00
Two Way Radio rental 100.00
Web Site 1000.00
Bill boards 1000.00
Posters 500.00
Applications 400.00
Tee Shirts 1000.00
Medals/Trophy/Prizes 500.00
Goodie Bags 800.00
Merchant/Vendor Booths 500.00
Food 1000.00
Water 500.00
Ambulance 1000.00
Stage Rental 1,300.00
Table and Chair Rental 250.00
PA and Speaker Rental 500.00
Clean-up Crew 400.00
Garbage Cans, pickup 500.00
Electrical Drops 500.00
   
Budget Overall —à  15,000

 

 
 

CITY SERVICE PRICE SCHEDULE OF OVERTIME RATES

FOR NEIGHBORHOOD FESTIVALS, PARADES AND ATHLETIC EVENTS (Evenings and Weekends)

Service Evening & Saturday Rate Sunday and Holiday Rate

(Time and a half) (Double Time)

 

Posting of No Parking Signs $40.17 per hour/laborer $53.56 per hour/laborer

Towing $43.43 per hour/driver/laborer $57.90 per hour/driver

Refuse Collection $40.17 per hour/laborer $53.56 per hour/laborer

$43.43 per hour/driver $57.90 per hour/driver

Street Sweeping $43.43 per hour/driver $57.90 per hour/driver

Electrical Services $60.60 per hour/electrician $80.80 per hour/electrician

& Maintenance

Electrical Drops $60.60 per hour/electrician $80.80 per hour/electrician

(Provide electrical power)

Sound Equipment $60.60 per hour/electrician $80.80 per hour/electrician

Stage $1,044.33 (flat fee) $1,373.92 (flat fee)

 

CONDITIONS:

1. There is a four-hour minimum for all services.

2. Equipment and services above is subject to availability.

3. Prices are subject to change without notice.

4. Reimbursements must be pre-paid to the City of Chicago by certified check at least one week before date of event.

5. The rates mentioned above do not apply to the Jumping Jack Program.

6. For Police overtime at Sporting Events, call (312) 744-7430.

*Prices and services are subject to change without notice.

 


 

Follow-up & Evaluation

  1. Match goals with actual results
  2. Follow-up communication with racers and volunteers
    i.      Send out report on how money was used.
    ii.      Promote next year’s race

A couple final notes: When planning a 5K or 10K remember that you are going to need plenty of water. Take the amount of water you think you’ll need and double it.

Additionally, it is very smart to hire a company or person to administer the timing of the race.

  • ·  Sit down with key people to get things going. See the related eHow titled “How to Plan an Organizational Meeting.”
    • ·  2

Identify the charity you want to support. For greater exposure, plan your event during a designated charity’s day or month. Set a date–rain or shine. Choose a starting time, and determine the length of the race and the route.

  • ·  3

Decide how many participants your team (and the course) can successfully handle. An event with several thousand runners or walkers is a whole different beast than one with several hundred. The more participants, the more spectators come to watch.

  • ·  4

Set a registration fee. For a short race like a 5K, charging runners and walkers a fee is preferable to having participants line up sponsors who pay by the mile.

  • ·  5

Hold your initial planning meeting. Establish procedures and discuss policies for registration, media relations and publicity, volunteers, safety, traffic management, first aid and other services such as massage and foot care, food, rest rooms, accommodations, cleanup and entertainment.

  • ·  6

Approach potential sponsors to help finance, publicize or even organize the event. Contact an athletic or sporting-goods store, a running club, a podiatrist, and local sports hero. Solicit corporate donations for water, energy bars, other snacks and sports drinks to be handed out along the route and at the end of the race. Sponsors will always want to promote their product with giveaways such as T-shirts, caps and water bottles.

  • ·  7

Contact law enforcement agencies about local ordinances, road closures, traffic barricades, crowd control and security issues.

  • ·  8

Get the word out to as many volunteers, runners and walkers as possible. See the related article “How to Publicize an Event” and contact a local TV station to see if it will get involved; maybe a news anchor is an avid runner.

  • ·  9

Organize training sessions prior to the event for participants to get in shape. How many and how far in advance they should begin are determined by the length and intensity of the event. Assume some participants are total couch potatoes and schedule training sessions and plan instructional materials accordingly. Marathons and two- and three-day walks require at least six months of training. A 5- or 10K requires more casual preparation–or none at all.

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